The Anticipatory Care Planning: Everyone’s Business Piktochart

Anticipatory Care Planning: Everyone's Business

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Anticipatory Care Planning Stories

We commissioned a series of films to introduce anticipatory care planning, how it can help to deliver person-centred care, and its benefits for people, families and their carers.

If you want to know more about anticipatory care planning or the making of these stories you can email Sheila Steel, Associate Improvement Advisor for ACP or follow her on twitter @SheilaSteel2.


A homeless person’s story – Duncan is 41 and has been in children’s homes, hostels, psychiatric care or homeless for most of his life.


A child’s story – Jack has a life-limiting condition. His parents have been told it is unlikely he’ll get to school age.


A carer’s story – Fiona was caring for her husband with cancer until he died. Now she is caring for her father alone.


An individuals story – Jim is in his fifties and is in the late stages of kidney failure caused by diabetes. His condition is terminal.


An ACP nurse’s story – Evelyn was admitted to hospital for the fourth time and diagnosed with Menieres diease. She is focussed on her illness rather than her recovery.

Find out more about Anticipatory Care Planning at myacp.scot

The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning

The ALLIANCE came along to our recent national Anticipatory Care Planning launch event and spoke to some of the delegates on the personal and professional value and impact of ACP.

Continue reading “The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning”

Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK

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The Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) launches today. This is a UK initiative to support Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) and the ACP process.

It is not planned to adopt ReSPECT immediately in Scotland after this UK launch, but we are considering a trial implementation of the ReSPECT process in a single health board later this year. The impact and benefits of this will be evaluated to inform discussions about the place and long term role of ReSPECT in Scotland.

Scotland has led the way with national frameworks that improve communication and the care of patients in the emergency setting. Prime examples of this are the national Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) integrated adult policy and the Children and Young People Acute Deterioration Management (CYPADM) policy. ReSPECT is intended to build on these and strengthen the person-centred nature of care people receive.

The ReSPECT form is designed to summarise recommendations and patient’s wishes so that this can inform care and treatment decisions they receive, should they become unwell in an emergency and they are unable to make their wishes known at the time. To do this, the ReSPECT process is intended to encourage good conversations around anticipatory planning. It should help create opportunities to discuss realistic treatment options and the aims of care that people would want more generally, and come to a shared understanding. Continue reading “Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK”

Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen

acpdocThe latest Anticipatory Care Planning: Time To Make It Happen event took place on 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons with participants from across the health and social care sector.

This was the second of three interactive workshops in which delegates learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was another busy day comprising three plenaries, three breakout sessions, and four updates from the tests of change highlighted at the first meeting.

Welcome and Opening Remarks 

Diane Murray (Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Scottish Government)
Dr Stuart Cumming (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Janette Barrie (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)
Sheila Steel (Associate Improvement Advisor, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Diane started proceedings with a personal story on the power of why, and the ways ACP matters to her. Stuart and Janette introduced the work so far, what’s progressed and looked to the future. All three providing a reminder that:

Anticipatory care is about people of all ages. Anticipatory care is everyone’s business.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen”

Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen 16/11/16

acpheaderAnticipatory Care Planning (ACP) is a key workstream within the Living Well in Communities portfolio, focussed on building improved models of care across Scotland.

Our next workshop takes place on Wednesday 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh.

The aim of this event is to discuss current ACP initiatives and help influence next year’s priorities.

The morning sessions give practitioners the opportunity to showcase the innovative work they are leading locally, supporting individuals of all ages. Further details about the workshops will follow soon.

The afternoon session will be a unique opportunity to view ‘Seven Songs for a Long Life’, Dr Amy Hardie‘s critically acclaimed documentary exploring our changing relationship with death.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen 16/11/16”

Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care

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The Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference took place on 22nd September, at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. In attendance, a range of people from palliative & end-of-life care and the health and social care sector (including of course Living Well in Communities).

This is a summary (and recording thanks to University of Glasgow’s End of Life team) of what went on during the day.



This year’s theme of Realistic Palliative Care was inspired by the CMO’s annual report: Realistic Medicine. The six point approach below is just as applicable to palliative care and quality of death.

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Making the Case for Palliative Care in Times of Austerity
Professor Charles Normand, Professor of Health Policy and Management, University of Dublin

What do people want? Less hassle. It is bad enough to be dying.

  • Evaluation of palliative care is difficult and important, so better tools for assessing value and cost need to evolve. It’s impossible to have simple measures for complex activities with complex objectives.
  • Early interventions can reduce costs and improve care, particularly for those with complex needs.
  • Improving access when needed and reducing stress on informal carers are common themes stated in palliative care preferences.
  • Those requiring care often have different goals and priorities than their families and carers.

Continue reading “Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care”

There’s No Place Like Home: Living Well in Communities at the NHSScotland Event

The Living Well in Communities team held two workshops at the NHSScotland Event, which took place at the SECC on 14th-15th June 2016. These sessions explored initiatives from Health and Social Care Partnerships across Scotland that are helping people to spend more time at home or a homely setting that would otherwise have been spent in hospital.

We’ve put together a Storify of the tweets from the sessions.

The sessions were chaired by Susanne Miller, Chief Officer for Strategy, Planning and Commissioning and Chief Social Work Officer for Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership. June Wylie, Head of Implementation and Improvement at Healthcare Improvement Scotland, introduced the Living Well in Communities portfolio and frontline speakers from across the different Living Well workstreams and related areas of work:

  • High Resource Individuals – Anne Palmer, Programme Manager, Connected Care, NHS Borders
  • Frailty and Falls – Rebekah Wilson, Ayrshire and Arran Falls Lead and Falls Community Connector.
  • Anticipatory Care Planning – Janette Barrie, Nationa Clinical Lead (Nursing) Anticipatory Care Planning, Healthcare Improvement Scotland
  • Housing – Maureen Cameron, Manager, Lochaber Care & Repair
  • Intermediate Care and Reablement – Lorna Dunipace (Day 1), Interim Head of Transformational Change (Older People), and Christine Ashcroft (Day 2), Service Manager, Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership
  • Palliative Care – Caroline Sime, Research Fellow University of the West of Scotland and Ardgowan Hospice

Here are some of the themes from the workshops: Continue reading “There’s No Place Like Home: Living Well in Communities at the NHSScotland Event”