Updates from the Neighbourhood Care national partners meeting

On 27th June we held our latest national learning event on the neighbourhood care work being tested across the country.

With representation from Health and Social Care Partnerships and national organisations, the aim of the workshop was as much about exploring the challenges to developing this model of care as it was about sharing learning and increasing knowledge across Scotland.

After welcomes and introductions from Ruth Glassborow (Director of Improvement Support and ihub), Chris Bruce provided some background on how Scotland became involved in learning from the Buurtzorg model in the Netherlands, with an overview of the work so far.

buurtzorg onion model

All agencies and partners involved in developing local models – using the principles of Buurtzorg (and in the spirit of self-organisation) – have worked together to develop tests and start building a national learning community.

The testing principles in Scotland

  • Promote independence
  • Continuity of support and carer – reduce fragmentation
  • Self-organising, flexible teams, focused on people
  • Back office / organisation focused on staff and people
  • Opportunities – accelerate integration at point of care, empower nursing and social care workforce, change commissioning practice

Each of the eight neighbourhood care test sites (Borders, Dumfries & Galloway, Highland, Stirling and Clackmannanshire, Angus, Aberdeen City, Western Isles and Cornerstone) gave an update on what they hoped to achieve from the model, what their progress has been and what challenges they’ve faced so far.

Common themes

There were a number of common themes across the test sites when discussing developments: governance, communication, engagement, change management and recruitment.

Realistic Medicine Scotland

There was a feeling that some aspects of clinical and corporate governance were making testing more difficult than it needed to be. Should we take a risk proportionate approach, rather than risk averse? Do we have to be (more) brave?

Isn’t this the realistic approach to medicine?

The sites highlighted a need for regulations to be simple, straightforward, scaled-down, and to learn from the 3rd sector. Cornerstone rewrote and reduced their policies and procedures from more than a hundred to single digits.

The Cornerstone approach:

Start with nothing, then see what you actually need.

the workforce

There was agreement that for a lot of people working in the service there is strength to be drawn from the common goals of the neighbourhood care models.

It’s a way of working that empowers staff, promotes autonomy and self-management. It’s a model that can offer increased satisfaction for those working in it, leading to better recruitment, retention and less absence.

The importance of buy-in from all staff (including those in corporate and leadership roles) is hugely important to progress.

We are trying to introduce change in a complex environment. And for some this will lead to uncertainty, around themselves, their role, their workplace. Sharing success from the testing can help reassure people that this can work in Scotland.

Communication

Part of this will come from our internal and external communications, information sharing and engagement.

We will continue to develop the self-managing network for learning and sharing best practice across the test sites, as well as building a digital platform for updates and charting progress.

We’ll have key messages that can be use locally and nationally to help spread the word.

What ties all of this together is building trust between all the different agencies and people involved in health and social care.

Let’s talk about how we should co-operate together instead of competing; with other professionals, with informal carers and other organisations. How we make younger people enthusiastic for the profession and much more. 

Jos de Blok, Buurtzorg founder

We want people to see the successes from the test sites and for them to want to be a part of it.

We want to share people’s stories, share learning and promote success more widely.

So check back over the coming months when we’ll update you more regularly on the work of the individual test sites, hopefully looking at the practical aspects of the models as well as the broader themes and issues.

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Intermediate Care & Reablement Atlas

atlas2.PNG

Chief Officers and their representatives from the 31 Health & Social Care Partnerships were invited to take part in Intermediate Care & Reablement scoping, comprised of an online survey and conversation about Intermediate Care & Reablement within their partnership area.

As part of the outputs from the scoping, the following Atlas provides information on the provision of Intermediate Care & Reablement across Scotland. It anticipated that this will be a live document that can be updated to reflect developments over time.

Download the atlas here or click the image above.

For further information, email Lianne McInallyYou can also follow Lianne on Twitter @LianneMcInally1

Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call For Action

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The Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call for Action event took place on 9th June at the COSLA building in Edinburgh with participants from across the Scottish (and Welsh) health and social care sector.

This is the first of three interactive workshops in which delegates will learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was a busy day (perhaps too busy…) comprising four plenaries, and four breakout sessions, with a focus on whole-system pathways, effective use of technology and information sharing, improving the interfaces between services and person-centred care and carers support.

Dr Gregor Smith, Deputy Chief Medical Officer from the Scottish Government opened the day with a welcome, highlighting the importance of ACP in achieving the 2020 vision, and reminding everyone to get their picture taken in the Selfie room with an ‘A Call For Action’ message (which he gamely obliged).

ACPcfa2 Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call For Action”

Working with care homes to reduce falls: Argyll and Bute Health and Social Care Partnership

Dunoon

By Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist, Healthcare Improvement Scotland

Argyll and Bute Health and Social Care partnership has been holding a series of quality improvement workshops for care home staff, in collaboration with Scottish Care. I went along to one of their workshops with care home staff in Dunoon on 10th May to find out more about the work that the partnership is doing with care homes.

Background

All 20 care homes in Argyll and Bute are signed up to a quality improvement project to reduce falls. Funded by the Integrated Care Fund, and supported by health professionals in each locality, the project aims to support care home staff to address falls risks in their care home. A particular emphasis is on improving physical activity for health and wellbeing.

The quality improvement workshops

Dr Christine McArthur, NHS Highland Coordinator Prevention and Management of Falls, Jane Howe, Quality Improvement Manager, and Kirsty Brown, Assistant Practitioner (Physiotherapy), facilitated the workshops. The team worked collaboratively with Scottish Care to develop events which met the needs of care home staff. The care homes requested a series of smaller local workshops, rather than one big event, as some staff do not drive and it was easier them to attend local events.

The team held workshops in Bute, Oban, Campbeltown, Dunoon and Helensburgh. Having dedicated events for care home staff and small group sizes ensured that all participants were able to contribute to discussions and ask the team for advice. Continue reading “Working with care homes to reduce falls: Argyll and Bute Health and Social Care Partnership”

Improving Care for People with High Levels of Need

HRI 1 PNG

(Source: Information Services Division Integrated Resource Framework. Data from 2012/13)

The High Resource Individuals team within Living Well in Communities is supporting Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs) through a series of data Deep Dives, to understand how those with the highest level of need interact with services.

Thomas Monaghan, Improvement Advisor, from Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s ihub, and Nathan Devereux, Associate Improvement Advisor, have been contributing to the wider work on High Resource Individuals by exploring ways of improving pathways of care, with support from the Local Intelligence Support Team (LIST) and Information Services Division (ISD).

These Deep Dives help partnerships explore their data on these individuals and identify areas for improvement.

Who are High Resource Individuals?

High Resource Individuals (HRIs) are the small number of people who use a high percentage of hospital and community prescribing resources and inpatient bed days.

Continue reading “Improving Care for People with High Levels of Need”

Living Well In Later Life: Event Outputs

LWLL & LWF conferences infographicThe Living Well in Later Life event, held at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh on the 26th of October brought together the colleagues from across the health and social care sector to discuss issues surrounding a person’s later life.

Hear from Angiolina Foster, Chief Executive at Healthcare Improvement Scotland and Ruth Glassborow, Director of Safety and Improvement on why it’s important that we support older people to live well in later life.

The day comprised morning and afternoon plenaries, as well as eight breakout sessions ranging from ‘What works in reducing social isolation – and how can we enable more of this?’ to ‘Focus on Dementia – home is where the heart is’. A comprehensive overview of each of the sessions is available below.

Continue reading “Living Well In Later Life: Event Outputs”

A Conversation With The Scottish Older People’s Assembly

For the Living well in Later Life conference we invited our friends from the Scottish Older People’s Assembly (SOPA) to talk to us about the issues facing older people in Scotland during Plenary session two – Celebrating later life.

What ensued was a lively conversation with Rob Snodgrass, Val Bissland, Tom Burney and Helen Biggins. Each question asked was answered fully and frankly by the panel leaving us with no doubt as to the strong voice SOPA provides to the health and social care conversation in Scotland.

Throughout the session Anne Gallagher shared two poems she’d written for the occasion with us and Rob, Val, Tom and Helen all spoke to camera to answer the question – What are the biggest challenges facing older people? Watch the video of their responses here.

Continue reading “A Conversation With The Scottish Older People’s Assembly”

Living Well In Later Life

What sorts of things come to your mind when you read the phrase ‘Living well in later life’? How can quality improvement help achieve this and why is the QI community across health and social care getting involved?

Surely how one lives, is not something that anyone other than the individual can control? Living well is about making your own decisions, about exercising choice. So why, one might ask are the health and social care organisations developing a programme that seeks to focus attention on this?

In a nutshell, what we are trying to do, through a series of projects is to empower older people and their loved ones to make decisions about how to live well in later life and provide guidance to help them navigate through the maze of choice of care solutions so that informed decisions about how one wishes to live well can be reached.

Continue reading “Living Well In Later Life”