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Updates from the Neighbourhood Care national partners meeting

On 27th June we held our latest national learning event on the neighbourhood care work being tested across the country.

With representation from Health and Social Care Partnerships and national organisations, the aim of the workshop was as much about exploring the challenges to developing this model of care as it was about sharing learning and increasing knowledge across Scotland.

After welcomes and introductions from Ruth Glassborow (Director of Improvement Support and ihub), Chris Bruce provided some background on how Scotland became involved in learning from the Buurtzorg model in the Netherlands, with an overview of the work so far.

buurtzorg onion model

All agencies and partners involved in developing local models – using the principles of Buurtzorg (and in the spirit of self-organisation) – have worked together to develop tests and start building a national learning community.

The testing principles in Scotland

  • Promote independence
  • Continuity of support and carer – reduce fragmentation
  • Self-organising, flexible teams, focused on people
  • Back office / organisation focused on staff and people
  • Opportunities – accelerate integration at point of care, empower nursing and social care workforce, change commissioning practice

Each of the eight neighbourhood care test sites (Borders, Dumfries & Galloway, Highland, Stirling and Clackmannanshire, Angus, Aberdeen City, Western Isles and Cornerstone) gave an update on what they hoped to achieve from the model, what their progress has been and what challenges they’ve faced so far.

Common themes

There were a number of common themes across the test sites when discussing developments: governance, communication, engagement, change management and recruitment.

Realistic Medicine Scotland

There was a feeling that some aspects of clinical and corporate governance were making testing more difficult than it needed to be. Should we take a risk proportionate approach, rather than risk averse? Do we have to be (more) brave?

Isn’t this the realistic approach to medicine?

The sites highlighted a need for regulations to be simple, straightforward, scaled-down, and to learn from the 3rd sector. Cornerstone rewrote and reduced their policies and procedures from more than a hundred to single digits.

The Cornerstone approach:

Start with nothing, then see what you actually need.

the workforce

There was agreement that for a lot of people working in the service there is strength to be drawn from the common goals of the neighbourhood care models.

It’s a way of working that empowers staff, promotes autonomy and self-management. It’s a model that can offer increased satisfaction for those working in it, leading to better recruitment, retention and less absence.

The importance of buy-in from all staff (including those in corporate and leadership roles) is hugely important to progress.

We are trying to introduce change in a complex environment. And for some this will lead to uncertainty, around themselves, their role, their workplace. Sharing success from the testing can help reassure people that this can work in Scotland.

Communication

Part of this will come from our internal and external communications, information sharing and engagement.

We will continue to develop the self-managing network for learning and sharing best practice across the test sites, as well as building a digital platform for updates and charting progress.

We’ll have key messages that can be use locally and nationally to help spread the word.

What ties all of this together is building trust between all the different agencies and people involved in health and social care.

Lets talk about how we should co-operate together instead of competing; with other professionals, with informal carers and other organisations. How we make younger people enthusiastic for the profession and much more. 

Jos de Blok, Buurtzorg founder

We want people to see the successes from the test sites and for them to want to be a part of it.

We want to share people’s stories, share learning and promote success more widely.

So check back over the coming months when we’ll update you more regularly on the work of the individual test sites, hopefully looking at the practical aspects of the models as well as the broader themes and issues.

The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning

The ALLIANCE came along to our recent national Anticipatory Care Planning launch event and spoke to some of the delegates on the personal and professional value and impact of ACP.

Continue reading “The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning”

Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards

by Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist

On Friday 12th May I headed to Inveraray for the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards. This is the first year of the awards, which celebrate outstanding care by nurses and other healthcare professionals, and were organised to coincide with International Nurses’ Day. Staff were nominated by colleagues, and there was also a patients’ choice award. Nominations were based on caring behaviours, including attentive listening, honesty, patience, sensitivity and respect. Continue reading “Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards”

Introducing Sandra Campbell

Sandra Campbell
Sandra Campbell, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care (Nursing)

I am absolutely delighted to have taken on the role of National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care for Nursing.

Having been in post for a few weeks I’m now beginning to link in with key individuals in each of the Health Boards to truly represent nursing across Scotland, ensuring the nursing voice is fully heard on behalf of patients and those important to them.

My passion is communication and I believe fully in the human connection that we as nurses have with our patients.

Compassion is about the human experience of noticing, feeling and responding.

Delivering compassionate care has to be fundamental for all staff, and supporting nurses to be able to do this is one of my main goals.

Strategic Framework for Action

The Scottish Government is committed to working in partnership to support a range of improvements in the delivery of palliative and end of life care in Scotland. Continue reading “Introducing Sandra Campbell”

Discussions from our intermediate care and reablement event

IC&R

Our intermediate care and reablement event took place at 200 St Vincent Street on 21st March 2017 and shared findings from our intermediate care scoping work, and learning from services across Scotland. The event was supported by the Scottish Government, Social Work Scotland and the Health and Social Care Benchmarking Network.

Isla Bisset from the Scottish Government presented data on delayed discharges from January 2017, and Deanna Campbell gave an overview of the intermediate care minimum dataset, which records different interventions, their impact, and whether an anticipatory care plan was in place. Outcomes included avoided hospital admissions and early supported discharge. Continue reading “Discussions from our intermediate care and reablement event”

Introducing Michelle Church

Michelle Church
Michelle Church, Improvement Advisor for Palliative Care

Around 54,000 people die each year in Scotland, most following an illness. Four times as many are affected by the loss of a loved one.

How do we best support these people to live well, help manage conditions and give quality and meaning to their life as their health declines?

This is the question I ask myself, as the Improvement Advisor for Palliative Care within Living Well in Communities, and as a daughter who looked after her Mom during the last few months of her life.

I loved my Mom so very dearly, and I started grieving while still caring for her. It was a time I found incredibly difficult.

Mom wanted to stay home but the say of doctors and the power of the system dominated the decision-making around her care. It seemed to me you were either in the system (hospital) or out (on our own).

Her palliative journey was one of pain and crisis. As her main carer, I gradually became exhausted and, whilst we tried to treasure her final months, her last few days were chaotic and full of interventions rather than the peace and respect she so very much deserved.

Many things have changed since then. Continue reading “Introducing Michelle Church”

Using a population screening tool to identify people with frailty in the community: the e-frailty index

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by Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist

The Challenge

A person with frailty can experience serious adverse outcomes following even a relatively minor illness. Timely identification of frailty can help to reduce the likelihood of a poor outcome following an intervention (or eliminate the need for an intervention entirely) and support the long-term management of people’s health needs.

If we can identify people with frailty in the community, we can offer preventative support that could improve their quality of life and reduce the risk of unscheduled admissions.

There are a number of tools which professionals can use to screen people for frailty (see the British Geriatric Society’s Fit for Frailty guidance). However, many of these tools are based on questionnaires that require practitioners to have direct contact with individuals and can only be used to assess people who are actively engaged with services.  It would be resource-intensive and challenging for services to screen large population groups for frailty using these individual assessments.

The risk stratification tool, Scottish Patients at Risk of Re-admissions or Admissions (SPARRA) identifies individuals within the whole population at risk of hospital admission based on nationally-collected data on acute admissions and community prescribing.  However, it does not discriminate frailty from other high-risk population groups and can only identify individuals who are known to services, as they have had recent acute admissions or have been prescribed high-risk medications.  Alternative population screening tools are needed to identify people with frailty living in the community. Continue reading “Using a population screening tool to identify people with frailty in the community: the e-frailty index”

Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK

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The Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) launches today. This is a UK initiative to support Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) and the ACP process.

It is not planned to adopt ReSPECT immediately in Scotland after this UK launch, but we are considering a trial implementation of the ReSPECT process in a single health board later this year. The impact and benefits of this will be evaluated to inform discussions about the place and long term role of ReSPECT in Scotland.

Scotland has led the way with national frameworks that improve communication and the care of patients in the emergency setting. Prime examples of this are the national Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) integrated adult policy and the Children and Young People Acute Deterioration Management (CYPADM) policy. ReSPECT is intended to build on these and strengthen the person-centred nature of care people receive.

The ReSPECT form is designed to summarise recommendations and patient’s wishes so that this can inform care and treatment decisions they receive, should they become unwell in an emergency and they are unable to make their wishes known at the time. To do this, the ReSPECT process is intended to encourage good conversations around anticipatory planning. It should help create opportunities to discuss realistic treatment options and the aims of care that people would want more generally, and come to a shared understanding. Continue reading “Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK”