Featured

Introducing Josaleen Connolly

Josaleen Connolly-01
Josaleen Connolly, Quality Improvement Practitioner (Cancer, Palliative Care-Primary Care)

I’ve been a registered nurse for 28 years, starting my career in Northern Ireland. I moved to community nursing in 1996. It was during this time I worked with Marie Curie Nursing Service in Northern Ireland.

I developed a passion for palliative care and worked mainly night-duty, caring for people in their homes and supporting their family.

This work prepared me for the expected loss when my mother died. As many people do, I helped care for her in her own home, where she died with her family around her in March 1999.

I saw first hand the support needed by different members of a grieving family, and what her death meant to them.

In 2001 we moved, with a young family, to South West Scotland and settled in a lovely farm over-looking the sea. I joined NHS Ayrshire & Arran and since then I’ve been supported to work and study caring for people with cancer and palliative care to degree and masters level.

Shortly after our move, my father died suddenly and unexpectedly. This opened up a different perspective on death, which I wasn’t as prepared for.

His death made me realise that there are different reactions to the ways in which people die, and the support needed in the weeks and months after is often different.

These experiences, and what I learned from them, remain with me.

I moved from clinical nursing to work on several palliative care projects improving palliative care in the community, including Gold Standards Framework in 2004 and more recently Macmillan Education Programme for upskilling generalists in palliative care in 2011.

A recent thesis study explored the knowledge and skills required by family members to look after someone who was palliative at home. This was another window into the support needed by families to use equipment, move people and general knowledge for managing medicines.

My interest remains in caring for the individual and their family during this distressing time, when people are often at their most vulnerable.

My aim is that the person can die peacefully in a place of their choosing, and their family will feel supported and cared for while caring for their loved one.

I’ll update you soon on the work I’ve been involved in around palliative beds in care homes.

In the meantime if you have any questions or are interested in finding out more about my work please get in touch, or follow @joseycolly on Twitter.

 

My Perspective on the SPPC Annual Conference

Paul and MichellePaul Baughan and Michelle Church, Improvement Advisor, with the Living Well in Communities poster at the conference

by Paul Baughan, GP and National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care, Healthcare Improvement Scotland

For some people, the Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care conference is an annual pilgrimage, resembling a school reunion where people involved in palliative care can come together and catch up with one another (whilst secretly hoping that they have not aged as much as that colleague from the north or west of Scotland that they have not seen for a couple of years!). The informal sharing of experiences, pressures and local initiatives is every bit as important as the diverse programme.

My aims for the day

I attended this year’s conference with a specific question about how I could use the learning to support our six palliative care test sites.  As joint clinical lead for palliative and end of life care with Healthcare Improvement Scotland, I am working with six health and social care partnerships (HSCPs) to support local improvement work around the early identification of those with palliative care needs and the co-ordination of their care.

We had the opportunity at the conference to display and discuss our poster, which outlines the approach and process which the test sites will undertake during their improvement work. There was great interest from the delegates regarding this work, which made me even more determined to use and apply learning from the day. Continue reading “My Perspective on the SPPC Annual Conference”

Testing the eFI in Scotland: focus on Midlock GP practice

 

Some members of the Living Well in Communities and Midlock teams at the NHSScotland event

The Living Well in Communities team is working with Health and Social Care Partnerships in Glasgow City, West Dunbartonshire and Midlothian to test the electronic frailty index (eFI) to identify people over 65 who are living with frailty in the community. The Living Well in Communities team have developed an assets-based approach to support evidence-based interventions that are tailored to the individual. This article looks at the work to date with Midlock GP practice in Glasgow.

The testing in Midlock GP practice

The eFI uses GP read codes to calculate an individual’s degree of frailty and stratifies them into fit, mildly frail, moderately frail and severely frail. The tool has been validated in England. The purpose of testing at Midlock GP practice was to determine if the tool was accurate in a Scottish context. We have been working with a GP and other members of Glasgow City HSCP, including housing and the voluntary sector. The testing involved stratification of the GP population for frailty and reviewing case scenarios to determine if the eFI tool fits with a Scottish population. Continue reading “Testing the eFI in Scotland: focus on Midlock GP practice”

Updates from the Neighbourhood Care national partners meeting

On 27th June we held our latest national learning event on the neighbourhood care work being tested across the country.

With representation from Health and Social Care Partnerships and national organisations, the aim of the workshop was as much about exploring the challenges to developing this model of care as it was about sharing learning and increasing knowledge across Scotland.

After welcomes and introductions from Ruth Glassborow (Director of Improvement Support and ihub), Chris Bruce provided some background on how Scotland became involved in learning from the Buurtzorg model in the Netherlands, with an overview of the work so far.

buurtzorg onion model

All agencies and partners involved in developing local models – using the principles of Buurtzorg (and in the spirit of self-organisation) – have worked together to develop tests and start building a national learning community. Continue reading “Updates from the Neighbourhood Care national partners meeting”

Intermediate Care & Reablement Atlas

atlas2.PNG

Chief Officers and their representatives from the 31 Health & Social Care Partnerships were invited to take part in Intermediate Care & Reablement scoping, comprised of an online survey and conversation about Intermediate Care & Reablement within their partnership area.

As part of the outputs from the scoping, the following Atlas provides information on the provision of Intermediate Care & Reablement across Scotland. It anticipated that this will be a live document that can be updated to reflect developments over time.

Download the atlas here or click the image above.

For further information, email Lianne McInallyYou can also follow Lianne on Twitter @LianneMcInally1

Anticipatory Care Planning Stories

We commissioned a series of films to introduce anticipatory care planning, how it can help to deliver person-centred care, and its benefits for people, families and their carers.

If you want to know more about anticipatory care planning or the making of these stories you can email Sheila Steel, Associate Improvement Advisor for ACP or follow her on twitter @SheilaSteel2.


A homeless person’s story – Duncan is 41 and has been in children’s homes, hostels, psychiatric care or homeless for most of his life.


A child’s story – Jack has a life-limiting condition. His parents have been told it is unlikely he’ll get to school age.


A carer’s story – Fiona was caring for her husband with cancer until he died. Now she is caring for her father alone.


An individuals story – Jim is in his fifties and is in the late stages of kidney failure caused by diabetes. His condition is terminal.


An ACP nurse’s story – Evelyn was admitted to hospital for the fourth time and diagnosed with Menieres diease. She is focussed on her illness rather than her recovery.

Find out more about Anticipatory Care Planning at myacp.scot

The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning

The ALLIANCE came along to our recent national Anticipatory Care Planning launch event and spoke to some of the delegates on the personal and professional value and impact of ACP.

Continue reading “The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning”