Understanding the success factors in Care Co-ordination

Our local Palliative & End of Life Care (PEOLC) test partners came together on 8th November 2018 to exchange knowledge and understand the success factors for care co-ordination. The morning session provided an opportunity for the five health and social care partnership test sites to share the improvements in care co-ordination that they have been taking forward locally. Each site has approached this challenge in a different way, working with different population groups, in different settings and with a variety of different interventions.  However, the objective to improve the co-ordination of palliative and end of life care remains consistent across each area, with promising early outcomes now emerging from this work.

map

 

Test Sites

We have five main test sites involved in identifying those who would benefit from a palliative care approach:

  • Dundee
  • Fife
  • East Ayrshire
  • Renfrewshire
  • Glasgow

 

Experts from Marie Curie, Ayrshire Hospice, Care Inspectorate, University of Edinburgh and The Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) were on hand to provide short stories and share current thinking to help with our understanding of Care co-ordination.

whos here today

 

The afternoon was a World Café format – a world café is a simple, effective and flexible format for hosting large group dialogue. It provides an opportunity to exchange and share knowledge. Test site leads led the table discussion and answer any questions in relation to their site and Care Co-ordination.

world caFE

Evaluation Comments

“This was a great day, what an opportunity to have a day with space to network, think and create for the future”

“Everyone’s opinion counted”

“Open environment to discuss palliative care with professionals in different areas”

“Rich conversations”

“Great opportunities to learn what is happening and being developed across Scotland and a chance to network and share ideas”

“Really valuable sharing and networking; very much stimulated ideas for us to test”

“Group discussions, listening to different ideas and realising that we are all wishing and working for the same outcome”

 

Key to good care co-ordination in PEOLC

Attendees tested out Mentimeter, a fun and interactive tool for presentations, to create a word cloud describing the key to good care co-ordination:

mentimeter

Closing comments from Paul and Sandra

Paul Baughan and Sandra Campbell (National Clinical Leads) provided some words from the day:

“There are many different components to good co-ordination of care at the end of life.   This gathering allowed those testing new ways of working to meet and share their progress with like-minded individuals and experts in the field of palliative care.  This knowledge exchange is mutually beneficial and has provided a renewed impetus for our five test sites to make progress with their change ideas.”

“It was an excellent day, with really engaging conversations and sharing of best practice… and great to hear about such good work across the country.”

Next Steps

Paul and Sandra are currently working on an evidence bundle for Care Co-ordination alongside the Evidence and Evaluation for Improvement Team (EEvIT), the first draft will be ready at the end of January. The evidence bundle will inform which interventions help people to die in their preferred place of death, which interventions help to decrease the percentage of hospital deaths, and the interventions that increase the percentage of deaths at home and in hospices.

 

For further information, please contact a member of our team at hcis.livingwell@nhs.net

Follow us on Twitter:@LWIC_QI, @turnersara99, @paulbaughan, @sandracampbellc65402031

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Supporting excellent palliative and end of life care in the community

Our recent poster, displayed at the Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care annual conference, provides an update on where we are with our palliative and end of life care work.

Capture

The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning

The ALLIANCE came along to our recent national Anticipatory Care Planning launch event and spoke to some of the delegates on the personal and professional value and impact of ACP.

Continue reading “The value and impact of Anticipatory Care Planning”

Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen

acpdocThe latest Anticipatory Care Planning: Time To Make It Happen event took place on 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons with participants from across the health and social care sector.

This was the second of three interactive workshops in which delegates learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was another busy day comprising three plenaries, three breakout sessions, and four updates from the tests of change highlighted at the first meeting.

Welcome and Opening Remarks 

Diane Murray (Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Scottish Government)
Dr Stuart Cumming (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Janette Barrie (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)
Sheila Steel (Associate Improvement Advisor, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Diane started proceedings with a personal story on the power of why, and the ways ACP matters to her. Stuart and Janette introduced the work so far, what’s progressed and looked to the future. All three providing a reminder that:

Anticipatory care is about people of all ages. Anticipatory care is everyone’s business.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen”

Discussions from the Scottish Care New Models of Care workshop

older-people-exercise

This post was written by Laura Dobie, the Living Well in Communities Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist. You can follow Laura on Twitter at @LauraKnowledge.

On Friday 21st October I went along to Scottish Care’s new models of care workshop. It was a really interesting day filled with discussions on the future of care delivery, which highlighted examples of innovation and good practice in care from across Scotland – and further afield.

Legislative and policy context

Donald Macaskill, CEO of Scottish Care, facilitated the workshop discussions and gave a summary of the myriad policy publications and legislation which are having an impact on the care sector:

There was also the uncertainty of Brexit, and the possible impact that it could have on staffing and funding. The National Living Wage implementation, NHS cost efficiencies, the reform of the care home contract, reform of care at home and housing support, reform of NHS boards and local government elections in May 2017 will all have an impact on the sector. Continue reading “Discussions from the Scottish Care New Models of Care workshop”

A Living Well in Communities Event: Behind The Scenes

This post was written by Sara Turner, the Living Well in Communities Admin Officer. You can follow Sara on Twitter @turnersara99.

The day has come.

It’s something you have been planning (so much planning…) for weeks, if not months and it’s finally here!

For me, there’s usually a dash of excitement as you jump out of bed. Sometimes it’s the sleepless night, tossing and turning, panicking that you are going to sleep through your 3 alarms, or that you’ve forgotten something and need to get to the venue to put your mind at rest.

You have been hawk-like, watching Eventbrite, monitoring numbers and answering queries, making sure those registered have included all the relevant details, but most importantly spelt their name correctly.

Continue reading “A Living Well in Communities Event: Behind The Scenes”

Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care

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The Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference took place on 22nd September, at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. In attendance, a range of people from palliative & end-of-life care and the health and social care sector (including of course Living Well in Communities).

This is a summary (and recording thanks to University of Glasgow’s End of Life team) of what went on during the day.



This year’s theme of Realistic Palliative Care was inspired by the CMO’s annual report: Realistic Medicine. The six point approach below is just as applicable to palliative care and quality of death.

infographic



Making the Case for Palliative Care in Times of Austerity
Professor Charles Normand, Professor of Health Policy and Management, University of Dublin

What do people want? Less hassle. It is bad enough to be dying.

  • Evaluation of palliative care is difficult and important, so better tools for assessing value and cost need to evolve. It’s impossible to have simple measures for complex activities with complex objectives.
  • Early interventions can reduce costs and improve care, particularly for those with complex needs.
  • Improving access when needed and reducing stress on informal carers are common themes stated in palliative care preferences.
  • Those requiring care often have different goals and priorities than their families and carers.

Continue reading “Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care”