Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen 16/11/16

acpheaderAnticipatory Care Planning (ACP) is a key workstream within the Living Well in Communities portfolio, focussed on building improved models of care across Scotland.

Our next workshop takes place on Wednesday 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh.

The aim of this event is to discuss current ACP initiatives and help influence next year’s priorities.

The morning sessions give practitioners the opportunity to showcase the innovative work they are leading locally, supporting individuals of all ages. Further details about the workshops will follow soon.

The afternoon session will be a unique opportunity to view ‘Seven Songs for a Long Life’, Dr Amy Hardie‘s critically acclaimed documentary exploring our changing relationship with death.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen 16/11/16”

Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference took place on 22nd September, at the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh. In attendance, a range of people from palliative & end-of-life care and the health and social care sector (including of course Living Well in Communities).

This is a summary (and recording thanks to University of Glasgow’s End of Life team) of what went on during the day.



This year’s theme of Realistic Palliative Care was inspired by the CMO’s annual report: Realistic Medicine. The six point approach below is just as applicable to palliative care and quality of death.

infographic



Making the Case for Palliative Care in Times of Austerity
Professor Charles Normand, Professor of Health Policy and Management, University of Dublin

What do people want? Less hassle. It is bad enough to be dying.

  • Evaluation of palliative care is difficult and important, so better tools for assessing value and cost need to evolve. It’s impossible to have simple measures for complex activities with complex objectives.
  • Early interventions can reduce costs and improve care, particularly for those with complex needs.
  • Improving access when needed and reducing stress on informal carers are common themes stated in palliative care preferences.
  • Those requiring care often have different goals and priorities than their families and carers.

Continue reading “Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care Annual Conference: Realistic Palliative Care”

There’s No Place Like Home: Living Well in Communities at the NHSScotland Event

The Living Well in Communities team held two workshops at the NHSScotland Event, which took place at the SECC on 14th-15th June 2016. These sessions explored initiatives from Health and Social Care Partnerships across Scotland that are helping people to spend more time at home or a homely setting that would otherwise have been spent in hospital.

We’ve put together a Storify of the tweets from the sessions.

The sessions were chaired by Susanne Miller, Chief Officer for Strategy, Planning and Commissioning and Chief Social Work Officer for Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership. June Wylie, Head of Implementation and Improvement at Healthcare Improvement Scotland, introduced the Living Well in Communities portfolio and frontline speakers from across the different Living Well workstreams and related areas of work:

  • High Resource Individuals – Anne Palmer, Programme Manager, Connected Care, NHS Borders
  • Frailty and Falls – Rebekah Wilson, Ayrshire and Arran Falls Lead and Falls Community Connector.
  • Anticipatory Care Planning – Janette Barrie, Nationa Clinical Lead (Nursing) Anticipatory Care Planning, Healthcare Improvement Scotland
  • Housing – Maureen Cameron, Manager, Lochaber Care & Repair
  • Intermediate Care and Reablement – Lorna Dunipace (Day 1), Interim Head of Transformational Change (Older People), and Christine Ashcroft (Day 2), Service Manager, Glasgow City Health and Social Care Partnership
  • Palliative Care – Caroline Sime, Research Fellow University of the West of Scotland and Ardgowan Hospice

Here are some of the themes from the workshops: Continue reading “There’s No Place Like Home: Living Well in Communities at the NHSScotland Event”

Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call For Action

20160609_145434

The Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call for Action event took place on 9th June at the COSLA building in Edinburgh with participants from across the Scottish (and Welsh) health and social care sector.

This is the first of three interactive workshops in which delegates will learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was a busy day (perhaps too busy…) comprising four plenaries, and four breakout sessions, with a focus on whole-system pathways, effective use of technology and information sharing, improving the interfaces between services and person-centred care and carers support.

Dr Gregor Smith, Deputy Chief Medical Officer from the Scottish Government opened the day with a welcome, highlighting the importance of ACP in achieving the 2020 vision, and reminding everyone to get their picture taken in the Selfie room with an ‘A Call For Action’ message (which he gamely obliged).

ACPcfa2 Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: A Call For Action”

Our Anticipatory Care Planning Work

ACP team

Our ACP team. Left to right: Dr Stuart Cumming, Janette Barrie, Sheila Steel

Work is now underway on the Living Well in Communities Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) work stream. This article introduces the new team who are delivering this work, gives some background information on ACP and recent work in Lanarkshire, and the work that we are doing in this area on the Living Well in Communities portfolio of improvement programmes.

What is Anticipatory Care Planning?

Anticipatory Care Planning involves health professionals and/or care providers working together with individuals and their carers to discuss their goals and wishes, and recording these decisions so that in the event of a gradual or sudden decline,  those providing care have clear guidance on what that person and his or her carer would wish to happen. It facilitates a whole-systems approach for people living with long-term conditions, ensuring that person-centred care and personal outcomes are achieved.

The Living Well in Communities ACP team

Our ACP team is made up of Sheila Steel, our Associate Improvement Advisor, from NHS Lanarkshire and our National Clinical Leads, Janette Barrie from NHS Lanarkshire and Dr Stuart Cumming from NHS Forth Valley.

Recent work in Lanarkshire: raising public awareness of Anticipatory Care Planning and Power of Attorney

For the last two years Lanarkshire’s health and social care partnerships have teamed up with Glasgow City Council and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board to raise public awareness of Power of Attorney (POA).  However, Lanarkshire saw the opportunity to incorporate anticipatory care planning into this campaign to raise the profile of both ACP and POA.

From the number of direct enquiries from members of the public regarding the anticipatory care planning process and how to initiate this, it was clear further information was required, building upon the TV and online campaigns.

Continue reading “Our Anticipatory Care Planning Work”