Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards

by Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist

On Friday 12th May I headed to Inveraray for the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards. This is the first year of the awards, which celebrate outstanding care by nurses and other healthcare professionals, and were organised to coincide with International Nurses’ Day. Staff were nominated by colleagues, and there was also a patients’ choice award. Nominations were based on caring behaviours, including attentive listening, honesty, patience, sensitivity and respect. Continue reading “Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards”

Living Well With Dyslexia

This post was written by Lianne McInally, Improvement Advisor, Living Well in Communities. You can follow Lianne on Twitter @LianneMcInally1.

dawLast week was Dyslexia Awareness Week. It also coincided with Occupational Therapy week. As an occupational therapist whose son is dyslexic it seemed fitting to share our journey so far.

Cian was born in October 2005 and I was incredibly proud as a mum when he took his first steps at 10 months and was walking by his first birthday. He talked quickly too and for those of you who know me that should come as no surprise!

He was a very active toddler who didn’t like to stand still for too long. He wasn’t interested in jigsaws or building bricks. He would prefer to drive tractors and play football. He was clever. He knew the various signs as we drove to and from nursery. He was able to tell you the numbers on the buses and where they went. All before starting school.

His transition report from preschool nursery to school was glowing. He had good pencil control, could recognise and write his name. There were no concerns.

In School 

Cian started primary school. One day a week I collected his friend from school. Often she would have her homework out and neatly finished before Cian had started. I noticed that despite being one of the youngest in the class she was coping better with the homework than Cian. People kept saying not to worry as often girls start quicker and boys aren’t interested at that stage. I don’t know how many times someone said he’s probably just a lazy boy!

With reading, Cian seemed to memorise the story and often used pictures to guess what was happening. At parent’s night in Primary 1 and 2 we discussed how things didn’t seem to click with writing. Cian was given a handwriting programme and we faithfully completed this as extra homework, even during the summer holidays. Despite this, his progress did not appear to equate with all the extra help.

Cian complained of headaches, sore stomachs and was diagnosed with childhood migraine. He also complained of fuzzy eyes and that the words jumped on the page.

visual_stress
An example of visual stress from the British Dyslexia Association

Continue reading “Living Well With Dyslexia”