Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards

by Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist

On Friday 12th May I headed to Inveraray for the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards. This is the first year of the awards, which celebrate outstanding care by nurses and other healthcare professionals, and were organised to coincide with International Nurses’ Day. Staff were nominated by colleagues, and there was also a patients’ choice award. Nominations were based on caring behaviours, including attentive listening, honesty, patience, sensitivity and respect. Continue reading “Celebrating great care at the Argyll and Bute Nursing Excellence Awards”

Introducing Sandra Campbell

Sandra Campbell
Sandra Campbell, National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care (Nursing)

I am absolutely delighted to have taken on the role of National Clinical Lead for Palliative and End of Life Care for Nursing.

Having been in post for a few weeks I’m now beginning to link in with key individuals in each of the Health Boards to truly represent nursing across Scotland, ensuring the nursing voice is fully heard on behalf of patients and those important to them.

My passion is communication and I believe fully in the human connection that we as nurses have with our patients.

Compassion is about the human experience of noticing, feeling and responding.

Delivering compassionate care has to be fundamental for all staff, and supporting nurses to be able to do this is one of my main goals.

Strategic Framework for Action

The Scottish Government is committed to working in partnership to support a range of improvements in the delivery of palliative and end of life care in Scotland. Continue reading “Introducing Sandra Campbell”

Putting the Buurtzorg Principles into Practice: our third learning network workshop

 

by Ben Lukins, Programme Manager, Healthcare Improvement Scotland. Follow Ben on Twitter at @blukins1

Our third learning network event took place on 13th October and allowed test sites to share their progress to date and further explore applying the principles of Buurtzorg. It was well-attended, with representatives from health, social care and the third sector and from across Scotland taking part in a lively day of discussions. You can view the Twitter highlights from the day in our Storify.

Sharing early learning from the test sites

Staff from the test sites shared their reflections on developing models of neighbourhood care and their motivations for change. The strong desire to deliver the best care possible to people resonated with everyone and fuelled the enthusiasm for the day. The discussions which followed reaffirmed the importance of this, and people acknowledged that it was acceptable to apply the principles of Buurtzorg in different ways across the different sites.

Enablers and challenges

Discussion about the enablers and challenges of progressing the work highlighted the strength drawn from the common goals of the work: improving care for individuals, and empowering staff. Groups discussed the importance of protecting the test sites and the challenge of doing so, in particular regarding regulation and inspection. People also felt that it was necessary to address misconceptions about obstacles which in fact may not exist, or may be easily addressed. Continue reading “Putting the Buurtzorg Principles into Practice: our third learning network workshop”

Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen

acpdocThe latest Anticipatory Care Planning: Time To Make It Happen event took place on 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons with participants from across the health and social care sector.

This was the second of three interactive workshops in which delegates learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was another busy day comprising three plenaries, three breakout sessions, and four updates from the tests of change highlighted at the first meeting.

Welcome and Opening Remarks 

Diane Murray (Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Scottish Government)
Dr Stuart Cumming (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Janette Barrie (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)
Sheila Steel (Associate Improvement Advisor, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Diane started proceedings with a personal story on the power of why, and the ways ACP matters to her. Stuart and Janette introduced the work so far, what’s progressed and looked to the future. All three providing a reminder that:

Anticipatory care is about people of all ages. Anticipatory care is everyone’s business.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen”

Testing an innovative model of care in the community: Buurtzorg

Buurtzorg Tests for Scotland: 1st July first gathering of tests co-production community from Nick Wilding on Vimeo.

Video highlights from the first Buurtzorg workshop

In this article we look at Buurtzorg, a Dutch model of community care, and talk about the work that we are supporting to test the principles of Buurtzorg in Scotland.

Where did Buurtzorg come from, and what does it involve?

Buurtzorg, which means neighbourhood care, is a delivery model for community care which was established in the Netherlands in 2007 to improve quality of care and outcomes for people. It puts the person at the centre of care and promotes staff autonomy and the provision of holistic care in the community.

Care is delivered by skilled generalist registered nursing teams, with a maximum of 12 nurses in a team. The teams organise themselves, and have a structure that promotes self-management, which gives nurses more freedom to respond to the needs of individuals. Regional coaches are available to support teams, although they work with a number of teams and do not act as managers.

The model was developed in response to a fragmented landscape of home care provision in the Netherlands, in which people were receiving care from multiple practitioners and providers. Rather than carrying out fixed tasks for people in isolation, the Buurtzorg model takes a holistic approach and looks at what patients and service users can learn to do for themselves again, reducing the need for care in the future. Its focus on neighbourhoods allows teams to use informal networks and work together with a range of professionals, such as GPs and pharmacists, and to engage in preventative activities. Continue reading “Testing an innovative model of care in the community: Buurtzorg”