Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK

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The Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) launches today. This is a UK initiative to support Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) and the ACP process.

It is not planned to adopt ReSPECT immediately in Scotland after this UK launch, but we are considering a trial implementation of the ReSPECT process in a single health board later this year. The impact and benefits of this will be evaluated to inform discussions about the place and long term role of ReSPECT in Scotland.

Scotland has led the way with national frameworks that improve communication and the care of patients in the emergency setting. Prime examples of this are the national Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) integrated adult policy and the Children and Young People Acute Deterioration Management (CYPADM) policy. ReSPECT is intended to build on these and strengthen the person-centred nature of care people receive.

The ReSPECT form is designed to summarise recommendations and patient’s wishes so that this can inform care and treatment decisions they receive, should they become unwell in an emergency and they are unable to make their wishes known at the time. To do this, the ReSPECT process is intended to encourage good conversations around anticipatory planning. It should help create opportunities to discuss realistic treatment options and the aims of care that people would want more generally, and come to a shared understanding. Continue reading “Launch of Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) in the UK”

Putting the Buurtzorg Principles into Practice: our third learning network workshop

 

by Ben Lukins, Programme Manager, Healthcare Improvement Scotland. Follow Ben on Twitter at @blukins1

Our third learning network event took place on 13th October and allowed test sites to share their progress to date and further explore applying the principles of Buurtzorg. It was well-attended, with representatives from health, social care and the third sector and from across Scotland taking part in a lively day of discussions. You can view the Twitter highlights from the day in our Storify.

Sharing early learning from the test sites

Staff from the test sites shared their reflections on developing models of neighbourhood care and their motivations for change. The strong desire to deliver the best care possible to people resonated with everyone and fuelled the enthusiasm for the day. The discussions which followed reaffirmed the importance of this, and people acknowledged that it was acceptable to apply the principles of Buurtzorg in different ways across the different sites.

Enablers and challenges

Discussion about the enablers and challenges of progressing the work highlighted the strength drawn from the common goals of the work: improving care for individuals, and empowering staff. Groups discussed the importance of protecting the test sites and the challenge of doing so, in particular regarding regulation and inspection. People also felt that it was necessary to address misconceptions about obstacles which in fact may not exist, or may be easily addressed. Continue reading “Putting the Buurtzorg Principles into Practice: our third learning network workshop”

Evaluating the application of the Buurtzorg principles in Scotland

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by Ben Lukins, Programme Manager, Healthcare Improvement Scotland. Follow Ben on Twitter @blukins1.

At the start of December we held a workshop exploring the evaluation of neighbourhood care at a national and local level. The workshop was well-attended and included academics with evaluation backgrounds, staff from some of the Scottish test sites, representatives from Buurtzorg, staff from the Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland and individuals from our national partners.

The importance of reflecting the local context was recognised and it was acknowledged that there was a richness in the qualitative information, drawn from staff’s experiences.  The group reflected that the evaluation was about looking at how the principles of Buurtzorg had been applied and not about evaluating the principles themselves.

Buurtzorg principles in Scotland

We spent time determining the principles that were being applied in Scotland and agreed on the following:

  • Putting the person at the centre of holistic care.
  • Building relationships with people to make informed decisions about their own care, which promotes wellbeing and independence with active involvement of family, neighbours and the wider community, where appropriate.
  • Everyone, including support functions, enabling person-centred care at the point of delivery.
  • Small self-organising, geographical-based teams.
  • Professional autonomy.

Continue reading “Evaluating the application of the Buurtzorg principles in Scotland”

Meet Ben Lukins!

ben_bwI would like to take the opportunity to introduce myself as the Programme Manager with Healthcare Improvement Scotland, responsible for coordinating the work on applying the principles of Buurtzorg to develop Scottish models of neighbourhood care.

I have been reflecting on how quickly time has flow by since coming into post in September. From the offset I was keen to immerse myself in Buurtzorg to understand the model, and to think about how we as a national body could best support the local work in Scotland.  A key part of this has been meeting with a number of people from different organisations, backgrounds and professions who have been part, or are keen to be part, of this work.

This has been a great opportunity to listen to myriad perspectives and thoughts. I have been struck by the enthusiasm of those I have talked to, many of whom are motivated by achieving the best possible outcomes for people, as well as making the role of those providing care truly fulfilling. The Buurtzorg model resonates so powerfully for so many, as it brings to the surface the reason they came into the caring profession, drawing from the richness that comes from building and sustaining meaningful relationships. Continue reading “Meet Ben Lukins!”

How care homes in Argyll and Bute are working to reduce falls

By Laura Dobie, Knowledge and Information Skills Specialist, Healthcare Improvement Scotland

On 5th December I went along to the Argyll and Bute Care Homes Quality Improvement for Falls Prevention event. It was a really interesting day, and it was great to hear about the work that care home staff are doing to reduce falls and improve quality of life for their residents.

PDSAs and data

Dr Christine McArthur, Project Lead, introduced the day and Sheila Morris, Occupational Therapy Care Home Lead, gave an overview of Plan Do Study Act cycles and the role of data in improvement. She emphasised the importance of carrying out small tests of change and having a clear plan.

The project participants then had the opportunity to discuss a case study of a 72-year-old lady who had had a number of falls, considering risk factors such as polypharmacy and multiple complex conditions, and reviewing the data in the falls diary to identify whether there was a pattern to her falls.

The care home staff observed that people are increasingly coming in to care homes with more mobility problems and multiple conditions and co-morbidities. Sheila commented that everyone in the care home sector is at risk of falling and should have a multifactorial falls assessmentContinue reading “How care homes in Argyll and Bute are working to reduce falls”

Scottish Ambulance Service Falls and Frailty Pathways Action Group first meeting

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On 25th November 2016 the Living Well in Communities team from Healthcare Improvement Scotland’s Improvement Hub (ihub) supported the first meeting of the Active and Independent Living Improvement Programme (AILIP) and Scottish Ambulance Service Falls and Frailty Action Group. This Storify summarises the discussions from the day. Presentations and other resources can be accessed on the Falls and Bone Health Community site.

 

Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen

acpdocThe latest Anticipatory Care Planning: Time To Make It Happen event took place on 16th November at the Royal College of Surgeons with participants from across the health and social care sector.

This was the second of three interactive workshops in which delegates learn about the emerging examples of good practice and help influence the future development of Anticipatory Care Planning (ACP) across Scotland.

It was another busy day comprising three plenaries, three breakout sessions, and four updates from the tests of change highlighted at the first meeting.

Welcome and Opening Remarks 

Diane Murray (Associate Chief Nursing Officer, Scottish Government)
Dr Stuart Cumming (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Janette Barrie (National Clinical Lead, Anticipatory Care Planning)
Sheila Steel (Associate Improvement Advisor, Anticipatory Care Planning)

Diane started proceedings with a personal story on the power of why, and the ways ACP matters to her. Stuart and Janette introduced the work so far, what’s progressed and looked to the future. All three providing a reminder that:

Anticipatory care is about people of all ages. Anticipatory care is everyone’s business.

Continue reading “Anticipatory Care Planning: Time to Make it Happen”

Living Well With Dyslexia

This post was written by Lianne McInally, Improvement Advisor, Living Well in Communities. You can follow Lianne on Twitter @LianneMcInally1.

dawLast week was Dyslexia Awareness Week. It also coincided with Occupational Therapy week. As an occupational therapist whose son is dyslexic it seemed fitting to share our journey so far.

Cian was born in October 2005 and I was incredibly proud as a mum when he took his first steps at 10 months and was walking by his first birthday. He talked quickly too and for those of you who know me that should come as no surprise!

He was a very active toddler who didn’t like to stand still for too long. He wasn’t interested in jigsaws or building bricks. He would prefer to drive tractors and play football. He was clever. He knew the various signs as we drove to and from nursery. He was able to tell you the numbers on the buses and where they went. All before starting school.

His transition report from preschool nursery to school was glowing. He had good pencil control, could recognise and write his name. There were no concerns.

In School 

Cian started primary school. One day a week I collected his friend from school. Often she would have her homework out and neatly finished before Cian had started. I noticed that despite being one of the youngest in the class she was coping better with the homework than Cian. People kept saying not to worry as often girls start quicker and boys aren’t interested at that stage. I don’t know how many times someone said he’s probably just a lazy boy!

With reading, Cian seemed to memorise the story and often used pictures to guess what was happening. At parent’s night in Primary 1 and 2 we discussed how things didn’t seem to click with writing. Cian was given a handwriting programme and we faithfully completed this as extra homework, even during the summer holidays. Despite this, his progress did not appear to equate with all the extra help.

Cian complained of headaches, sore stomachs and was diagnosed with childhood migraine. He also complained of fuzzy eyes and that the words jumped on the page.

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An example of visual stress from the British Dyslexia Association

Continue reading “Living Well With Dyslexia”